School of Chemical Engineering

Professor Peter Hayes

Professor
Office: 44-255E
Phone: +61 7 3365 3551
Email: p.hayes@uq.edu.au
Biography: 

Prof Hayes is Xstrata Professor of Metallurgical Engineering within the School of Chemical Engineering. He is currently the Metallurgical Engineering Program leader and is senior researcher in the Pyrometallurgy Research Group (PYROSEARCH). He received his PhD from the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, Scotland, in 1974.

Research: 

Professor Peter Hayes's research focuses on the high temperature processing of minerals and materials, with particular application to the pyrometallurgical production and refining of metals. His interests include chemical equilibria, reaction kinetics and mechanisms.

His current research projects encompass:

  • High temperature phase equilibrium measurements and determination of liquidus isotherms in complex industrial slag systems relevant to the smelting of copper, ferro-chromium, ferro-manganese, iron, ferro-nickel, lead, zinc and to coal ash slags.
  • The development of thermodynamic models, and their use in conjunction with FactSage, to predict phase equilibria and thermodynamic properties in oxide systems.
  • Reaction kinetics and mechanisms in metal and materials processing, smelting and refining; in particular, gas/solid reactions.
Teaching and Learning: 

Prof Hayes’ teaching interests include pyrometallurgy, chemical thermodynamics, and physical and chemical processing of minerals.

He is author of the textbook “Process Selection in Minerals and Materials Production” by P.C. Hayes, Hayes Publishing Co, Sherwood, Brisbane, 3rd ed. 2004, and has been activity involved in program and curriculum development in the field of metallurgical engineering over a several decades.

Projects: 
  1. A novel low-energy process route for primary copper production utilising synergistic hydro- and pyrometallurgical processes.
  2. The significant impacts of morphological and interface stability on gas/solid reaction kinetics and for metals production.
  3. Phase equilibria studies and the formation of iron ore sinters for the iron blast furnace.
  4. Fundamental experimental and modelling studies of slag/metal/gas systems in support of sustainable copper smelting and converting technologies.
Key Publications: 
  1. St JOHN D.H., MATTHEW S.P. and HAYES P.C., “The breakdown of dense iron layers on wustite in CO/CO2 and H2/H2O systems”, Metall. Trans. B., 15B, 1984, pp 701-8.

This AMIRA industry funded project on iron oxide reduction was the first to identify this mechanism of reduction and systematically characterise the conditions under which it occurs.

  1. MATTHEW S.P. and HAYES P.C., “Microstructural changes occurring during the gaseous reduction of magnetite”, Metall. Trans. B., 1990, 21B, pp 153-172.

The first systematic study characterising the changes in reaction mechanism on high temperature reduction of magnetite in H2/H2O gas mixtures

  1. MATTHEW S.P., CHO T.R. and HAYES P.C., “Mechanisms of porous iron growth on wustite and magnetite during gaseous reduction”, Metall. Trans B, 1990, 21B, pp 733-741.

Seminal research on reaction mechanisms and phase transformations on iron oxide reduction.

  1. JAK E., LUI N., LEE H.G., WU P., PELTON A.D. and HAYES P.C., “Phase equilibria in the system PbO-CaO-SiO2.” Intl. Symp. on Zinc and Lead 95, Sendai, May 1995, pp 747-755. This was a significant study that demonstrated the new research techniques developed by the CI’s could be applied to systems that could not previously be studied using conventional techniques.
  1. Jak E., and Hayes p.c. “Experimental liquidus in the PbO - ZnO -“Fe2O3”- (CaO+SiO2) system in air with CaO/SiO2 weight ratio of 0.35 and PbO/(CaO + SiO2) = 3.2.” Metall. Trans. B, 2002, vol. 33B, pp. 851-863.

TMS Science Award-winning study 2004 (co-recipients P.C. Hayes and E. Jak). First characterisation of these complex slag systems critical understanding the chemistry of lead smelting slags.

  1. Jak E., and Hayes p.c. “Experimental liquidus in the PbO - ZnO -“Fe2O3”- (CaO+SiO2) system in air with CaO/SiO2 weight ratio of 0.35 and PbO/(CaO + SiO2) =5.0.” Metall. Trans. B, 2002, vol. 33B, pp. 817-825.

TMS Science Award-winning study 2004 (co-recipients P.C. Hayes and E. Jak). First characterisation of these complex slag systems critical understanding the chemistry of lead smelting slags.

  1. Jak E., Zhao B. and Hayes p.c. “Experimental study of phase equilibria in the “FeO”-ZnO-(CaO+SiO2) system with the CaO/SiO2 weight ratio of 0.71 at metallic iron saturation”, Metall. Mater. Trans. B, 2002, vol. 33B, pp. 865-876, ibid , 2003, vol.34B, pp. 383-397. ibid, 2003, vol.34B, pp. 369-382.

TMS Science Award-winning study 2004 (co-recipients P.C. Hayes and E. Jak). First characterisation of these complex slag systems critical understanding the chemistry of lead smelting slags.

  1. YAMASHITA T. and HAYES P.C., “Analysis of XPS spectra of Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions in oxide materials”, Applied Surface Sci., 2007, vol. 254(8), pp. 2441-2449.

Most Cited paper in Applied Surface Sci., 2008-2010. Scopus citations: 330 times to date. Established a new standard technique for accurate surface analysis of ferrous and ferric iron using XPS.

  1. NIKOLIC S., HAYES P. C. and JAK E., “Phase equilibria in ferrous calcium silicate slags Parts I-III: Copper saturated slag at 1250oC and 1300oC at an oxygen partial pressure of 10-6atm”, Metall. Mater. Trans. B, 2008, vol. 39B, pp. 178-188; ibid. pp. 189-199; ibid. pp. 200-209; ibid. pp.210-217.

TMS Science Award-winning study 2010 (co-recipients S. Nikolic, P. C. Hayes, H. Henao, E. Jak) providing fundamental data on liquidus temperatures of complex slags at controlled oxygen partial pressures.

  1. HAYES P.C. “Stability criteria for product microstructures formed on the reduction of solid metal oxides”. Metall. Mater. Trans. B, 2010, vol. 41B(1), pp.19.-34.

TMS Science Award-winning paper 2012 (Hayes). An important conceptual advance in understanding establishing the fundamental link between liquid/solid and gas/solid transformation mechanisms, and the theoretical basis for the morphology map concept.